Urbanscape of Mirage – Vital Signs – Stanford University

Cassils and Harry Gamboa Jr.
Stanford University
Photo: Georgina Hernandez

Artist Talk  | Harry Gamboa Jr. Presents “Urbanscape of Mirage”

Thursday
October 19, 2017
4:00pm – 6:00pm

Roble Gym  |  75 minutes including Q&A

Imagery of Asco (1972-1985), Virtual Vérité (2005 – 2017), and current performance works will accompany this lecture that focuses on the recent demolition of the iconic Los Angels 6th Street Bridge, the confluence of freeways, and the familiar nondescript locations that often serve as a starting point for anonymous journeys across an ocean of undulating asphalt. The swirling milieu of multiple cultures/languages of Los Angeles are in perpetual collision/melding/erasure as sudden tectonic shifts reset the clock towards countdown to consciousness. The historical relevance of events and places are subject to system loss of memory.


VITAL SIGNS
2017-2018 Guest Performance Artist Series  |  Curated by Cassils
https://taps.stanford.edu/vitalsigns.html

Guest artist series to expose Stanford students to innovative performance art
Stanford News
October 13, 2017
https://news.stanford.edu/2017/10/13/guest-artist-series-expose-stanford-students-innovative-performance-art/

http://www.harrygamboajr.com

Harry Gamboa Jr. – The Asco Years – Marlborough Contemporary

Harry Gamboa Jr. – The Asco Years – Marlborough Contemporary

September 7 – October 7, 2017

Viewing Room
Marlborough Contemporary
545 West 25th Street New York, NY 10001
+1 (212) 463 8634
http://www.marlboroughcontemporary.com/exhibitions/viewing-room-harry-gamboa-jr

Gallery Walk-Thru
Saturday
September 30, 2017
6:30 pm – 8:30pm

Attendees

Brenda Zamora

Leo Fitzpatrick, Director, and Harry Gamboa Jr.
Photo:  C. Ondine Chavoya, Ph.D.

In 1972, I co-founded Asco (Spanish for nausea), an East Los Angeles-based artist collective that included core members: Willie Herrón, Gronk, Patssi Valdez, and oftentimes, Humberto Sandoval. Asco emerged from the intense politics of the 1960’s Chicano Movement but also from the hybridity of 20th Century angst/determination that would propel all American youth to question cultural norms, the Vietnam War, and modern to post-modern media influences.

The Asco artists grew up in 1950s-1970s Los Angeles under a shroud of fallout-laden smog that tinted the urbanscape so that mass-media negative stereotypes would stand out in flagrant false relief against the reality of thriving cultures, which were moving quickly towards a vibrant amalgam of languages, customs, and visions. Decoy Gang War Victim employed various cinematic techniques to create an image that would reverberate and crossover into mainstream media consciousness by being presented on local television as having been the actual documentation of the last gang member to be killed in an absurd fait accompli that would contradict the propaganda campaign of major newspapers, which were promoting gang warfare. First Supper (After A Major Riot) was staged and photographed in the exact location where a major police riot had taken place and peaceful protesters who were mourning the assassination of acclaimed English/Spanish language journalist Ruben Salazar were brutally attacked. The site had been under strict condemnation by the authorities, but Asco declared it to be a place of celebration and a feast for the eyes.

The use of our 1970s youthful bodies to create art was in absolute opposition to what was expected of us by a society that often employed harsh methods of oppression, poor educational systems, synchronized narratives that often-portrayed Chicana/o youth in a dismal light despite the long history of active engagement in generating scholarship, impressive creative works, and with full-fledged heroic defense of the United States during time of war and other historical situations. To become self-defined and visually assertive in photographic form depicted a new version that would require complex interpretations. X’s Party and Instant Mural consists of private/public encounters that push the boundaries of persistence and erasure. The absurdity of self-denial is made manifest in A La Mode.

Asco engaged in numerous actions and produced many works during its existence (1972-1985) while being excluded from exhibitions and discourse of official contemporary art canon. In 2011, Los Angeles County Museum of Art presented Asco: Elite of the Obscure, a major retrospective, that served to introduce Asco to an eclectic national and international audience.

Harry Gamboa Jr. – The Asco Years is presented here for a 21st Century viewership that has so much to consider and to reflect upon while taking a closer look at what was and what is currently taking place in our world.

— Harry Gamboa Jr., Los Angeles, September 2, 2017

Harry Gamboa Jr. – The Asco Years
Flashart
October 3, 2017
https://www.flashartonline.com/2017/10/harry-gamboa-jr-marlborough-contemporary-newyork

The Glam Politics of a Chicano Collective from East L.A.
The New Yorker
September 16, 2017
https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/theglam-politics-of-a-chicano-collective-from-east-la

The ASCO Years’ by Harry Gamboa Jr. at Marlborough Contemporary
BLOUIN ARTINFO
September 17, 2017
http://www.blouinartinfo.com/news/story/2528595/diverting-the-mainstream-the-asco-years-by-harry-gamboa-jr-at

Art Out: Harry Gamboa Jr. – The ASCO Years
Musée
http://museemagazine.com/culture/2017/9/8/art-out-harry-gamboa-jr-the-asco-years
September 8, 2017

 

 

http://www.harrygamboajr.com

Chicano Male Unbonded

Harry Gamboa Jr. photographing Roy Martinez, Artist, for Chicano Male Unbonded series.
Los Angeles, 2016
©2016, Denae Howard

 

Harry Gamboa Jr.: Chicano Male Unbonded
https://theautry.org/exhibitions/harry-gamboa-jr-chicano-male-unbonded

Opens September 16, 2017

Autry Museum of the American West
4700 Western Heritage Way
Los Angeles, CA 90027-1462

Map and Directions:
Museum Hours
Tuesday–Friday: 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Saturday–Sunday: 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Closed Mondays.

also

LA/LA/LA
http://www.robertbermangallery.com/exhibitions/la-la-la?view=slider#11
Robert Berman Gallery
September 9 – October 14, 2017
At Bergamot Station Arts Center
2525 Michigan Avenue, Suite B7
Santa Monica, California 90404

P: 310.315.1937
F: 310.315.9688
E: info@robertbermangallery.com
Gallery Hours:
Tuesday through Saturday, 11am – 6pm

Harry Gamboa Jr. – Chicano Male Unbonded Photography Series
Excerpt from essay COLA 96 97 98 exhibition catalogue (pg. 26)
written by
Robert Byer

Gamboa’s work has continued in this “social surrealist” vein, driven by a need to distort and magnify the absurdity, chaos, and violence of contemporary urban experience.  As in Gamboa’s other work, the Chicano Male Unbonded series rhetorically exaggerates and mocks stereotypical perceptions of ethnic identity as a response to his awareness of the complexities of negotiating and affirming it.  The strategy of the photographs is simultaneously to acknowledge and counteract the image of the Chicano male as signifier of urban danger and criminality, as menacing Other.  Gamboa poses and photographs his subjects in a way that seems to confirm or heighten such stereotypical connotations.  A sense of dangerous confrontation is evoked by a series of theatrical devices:  the men stand alone in deserted, dimly lit outdoor urban settings at night; with arms crossed or in their pockets, they look directly and unsmilingly into the camera; a low camera angle endows them with a presence that looms menacingly over us.  These characters of the urban setting and of self-presentation guide the viewer to reductively read them as signifiers of the character of the photo graphed subjects, as identifying marks of Chicano maleness.  This reading is subverted by the titles and captioned biographies of the photographed subjects, who are identified as academics, artists, actors, lawyers and other professionals, pillars of the community not the potential muggers they at first appear to be.  Another look discloses quite ordinary dress and unremarkable physiognomies.  The idea of “the Chicano male” is displaced finally by a series of individuals who do not exhibit any obvious visible qualities which connects or defines them as “Chicano,” a quality contained by rather than containing them.  His subjects, then, are “unbonded” both in our initial sense of them being not yet bonded (that is, criminally dangerously, on the loose, beyond the control of the authorities), and in our final sense of their being freed from such “bonded” images and from the bonding performed by such images.

©1998, 
City of Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department

 

Selected works from Chicano Male Unbonded series are in the permanent collection of the following institutions:

Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery
Washington, D.C.

Autry Museum of the American West
Los Angeles, California

 

Video

Harry Gamboa Jr.’s ‘Chicano Male Unbonded’ Highlights Diversity Of Chicano Male Identity
Artbound
KCET
September 15, 2017
https://www.kcet.org/shows/artbound/harry-gamboa-jrs-chicano-male-unbonded-highlights-diversity-of-chicano-male-identity

 

Suggested Reading

East L.A. Punk Pioneer Gerardo Velasquez Lives On In a Chinatown Gallery Show
Liz Ohanesian
L.A. Weekly
October 16, 2017
http://www.laweekly.com/arts/how-gay-east-la-punk-pioneer-gerardo-velasquez-translated-his-aesthetic-into-art-8758030

Harry Gamboa Jr. at Autry Museum
Anna Garner
Contemporary Art Review
October 6, 2017
http://contemporaryartreview.la/harry-gamboa-jr-at-autry-museum-of-the-american-west/

Harry Gamboa Jr.
Travis Diehl
Artforum
September 12, 2017
https://www.artforum.com/words/#entry71024

Chicano Males Stare Down Stereotypes
Brian de los Santos
NPR
April 25, 2013
http://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2013/04/25/178668030/chicano-males-stare-down-stereotypes

The Artists Take Over

Katie Schaufelberger
Los Angeles Downtown News
November 5, 2010
http://www.ladowntownnews.com/articles/2010/11/05/entertainment/doc4cd47f04b3103706462176.txt

This side of paradise
Jana J. Monji
Pasadena Weekly
July 3, 2008
http://www.pasadenaweekly.com/cms/story/detail/this_side_of_paradise/6140

‘This Side of Paradise’ at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens
Christopher Knight
Los Angeles Times
Wednesday, June 18, 2008
Page E1
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/arts/la-et-paradise18-2008jun18,0,7824256.story

Technological Rituals: 
Stories From The Annenberg Dialogues n.1 and n.2

Rosanna Albertini
Annenberg Center for Communication 
University of Southern California 
Los Angeles, California 
1999

Harry Gamboa Jr.

Robert Byer
COLA 96/97/98 
exhibition catalogue (
pgs. 26 & 27)
Municipal Art Gallery
Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department 
Los Angeles, 1998

A “COLA” That Refreshes 

Christopher Knight
Los Angeles Times
Calendar (pgs. 1 & 8)
May 27, 1998

http://articles.latimes.com/1997-05-27/entertainment/ca-62803_1_municipal-art-gallery/2

Resolutions:  Contemporary Video Practices
Edited by Michael Renov, Erika Suderburg
University Of Minnesota Press
1995

The Magic Of Photography: 
Ideas Images Take Shape At Fotofest 94 

Johnson, Patricia C.
The Houston Chronicle 
Houston, Texas
November 14, 1994

Losing Focus?
Houston Press
December 1, 1994

http://www.houstonpress.com/1994-12-01/culture/losing-focus

Contemporary Identities:  1993 Phoenix Triennial:  23 Artists
Bruce D. Kurtz, Karen C. Hodges
Phoenix Art Museum
1993

Exhibiting Tolerance 

The Arizona Republic 
(pg. E1)
Phoenix, Arizona
August 22,1993


Images Capture Human Drama
David Steinberg
Albuquerque Journal 
Albuquerque, New Mexico
February 28, 1992

Curriculum Viva: 
An Art Of Persona By Latinos Of Los Angeles
Margaret Lazzari
Visions 
Vol.6, No. 2
Los Angeles, California
Spring, 1992

Iluminado Fronteras
Kurt Hollander
Poliester 
Numero 1
Mexico D.F., Mexico
Primavera, 1992


Report From Los Angeles: 
Community Access
Kurt Hollander
Art In America 
(Vol. 80, No. 6
pgs. 57-61)
New York, New York
June, 1992


Iluminado: 
Insight From Inside 

Susan Kandel
Los Angeles Times
Calendar section 
Los Angeles, California
August 15, 1991

http://articles.latimes.com/1991-08-15/entertainment/ca-574_1_public-art

 

Chicano Male Unbonded has been funded in part by fellowships awarded by the following organizations:

The Rockefeller Foundation/CSULA

2004

The Durfee Foundation

2001

The Flintridge Foundation

2000

California Arts Council

1996

Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department

1996

Art Matters, Inc.

1996

J.P. Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts

1990

 

Special thanks to:

Larry Liang

Bailey Wong


Chon Noriega, Ph.D.
UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center

Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano, Ph.D.

Stanford University

Eloy Rodriguez, Ph.D.

Cornell University

Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez, Ph.D.

Arizona State University

Daniel Centofanti

 

Individuals included in the series:

Father Richard Estrada, Priest, Church of the Ephphany (Episciopal Church), 2017
from Chicano Male Unbonded series
©2017, Harry Gamboa Jr.
11 inches x 14 inches
Gelatin Silver Print
Edition of six

2017
Father Richard Estrada, Priest, Church of the Ephphany (Episciopal Church)
Daniel Hernandez, Journalist
Esteban Perez, Artist
Hugo Hopping, Artist
Angelo Gomez, Artist
Eduardo Robles, Mescalero
Daniel Quinonez, Brewer/Theorist

2016
Raul Baltazar, Artist
Roy Martinez, Artist

2013
Abel Baker Gutierrez, Artist
Benjamin Quiñones, Writer
Andres Garza, Film Director
Pete Galindo, Producer

2012
Orlando Tirado, Writer

2011
Louie Pérez, Musician (Los Lobos)
Rupert Garcia, Artist
Vance Valencia, 
Actor 


Arnulfo Reyes, 
Photographer
Gabriel Gutierrez, Ph.D.
Historian
, CSU Northridge

Juan Renteria
, Photographer
Jose Lopez, Light Artist

Gregory Bojorquez, 
Photographer, 2010
from Chicano Male Unbonded
©2010, Harry Gamboa Jr.
11 inches x 14 inches
Gelatin Silver Print
Edition of six

2010
William Moreno
, Impresario
Ricky Garay, 
DJ/Promoter
Armando Duron
, Attorney
Gregory Bojorquez, 
Photographer

2009
Mario Ybarra Jr.
, Artist


2008
James E. Blancarte, 
Attorney

Antonio Vigil
, Artist

Chuy Benitez
, Photographer

Carlos Frésquez
, Artist 

Arnoldo Vargas, 
Photographer

Salomon Huerta, 
Artist


2007
Vincent Ramos
, Artist

Mario T. Garcia, Ph.D.
, Historian
, UC Santa Barbara

Andres Janacua, 
Artist

Daniel Cenedejaz
, Student, 
CSU Northridge

Alejandro Cenedejaz Mendez, 
Student

Gilbert “Magú” Lujan
, Artist
, 2005
from Chicano Male Unbonded
©2005, Harry Gamboa Jr.
11 inches x 14 inches
Gelatin Silver Print
Edition of six

2005
A.P. Gonzalez, 
Writer/Director (UCLA) 

Abel Correa, 
Student/Community Political Activist, 
UI Urbana-Champaign

Dominique Rodriguez
, Musician
 (Killsonic)

Fidel E. Gomez
, Actor

Leo Limón
, Artist
Raudel de la Riva, 
Artist

Del Zamora, 
Actor

Manuel G. “Oso” Lopéz, 
Witness/Warrior
Luis R. Torres
, Journalist
David Sandoval
, Director
, Educational Opportunity Program
, CSU Los Angeles

Adolfo “Rudy” Vargas
, Media Designer

John Ramirez, Ph.D., 
Chair
Department of Communcation Studies
, CSU Los Angeles

Gilbert “Magú” Lujan
, Artist

Naiche Starhawk Lujan, 
Musician

Juan Pacheco
, Social Documentary Photographer

Julián Segura Camacho
, Author 


2004
Richard Corona, 
Provocateur

Ernesto Chávez, Ph.D.
Historian, 
UT El Paso

Luis J. Rodriguez, 
Author/Activist

Mike Muñoz
, School Counselor

William Franco, Artist

Victor Valle
, Scholar/Journalist


2003
Gabriel Vallejo, 
Filmmaker/Writer

Lionel Maldonado, Ph.D.
, Chair
Chicano/a Studies, 
CSU Los Angeles

Miguel Paredes Jr.
,Writer

Pete Navarro, 
Attorney

Angel Carrillo, 
Community Activist
Eriberto 
Artist
, Westwood 

James T. Rojas
, Urban Analyst
Gerard Meraz, 
DJ/Mix Master

2001
Adam Avila,  
Photographer

George Silva, 
Writer

Francesco X. Siqueiros
, Master Printer/Artist

Joey Terrill, 
Artist

Francisco Martinez, 
Worker

Jose Lopez, 
Light Artist
Marcos Loya, 
Musician

Jose Lopez-Morin, Ph.D., 
Historian
, CSU Dominguez
Bobby Verdugo, 
Counselor

Eugene Rodriguez, 
Artist


Jaime Villaneda, 
Curator, 2000
from Chicano Male Unbonded series
©2000, Harry Gamboa Jr.
11 inches x 14 inches
Gelatin Silver Print
Edition of six

2000
Rodolfo Acuña, Ph.D.
, Historian
, CSU Northridge

Luis Becerra, 
Artist
Charles Canales, 
Contemporary Arts Advocate
Victor Carrillo, 
Poet

Tony Castañeda
, Student, 
CSU Northridge

George Cisneros, 
Artist/Composer
Xavier Cázares Cortéz, 
Artist/Curator

Reuben de Leon, 
Cultural Planner

Mario Flores
, High School Teacher

William Flores, Ph.D.
, Dean
, CSU Northridge

Jorge Garcia, Ph.D.
, Dean
, CSU Northridge

Ramon Garcia, Ph.D.
, Chicano Studies Professor
, CSU Northridge

Ruben Guevara, 
Cultural Activist/Performer
Willie Herrón
, Artist/Musician

Jef Huereque
, Artist/Designer

Robert Diaz Le Roy
, Film Director/Actor

Harry Ortíz Liflan
, Artist 

Joe Medina
, Photographer

Jim Mendiola
, Film Director

Ruben Mendoza
, Author

Sergio Muñoz-Sarmiento
, Artist/Writer

Mario Ontiveros, Ph.D., 
Art Historian

Brandon Perez
, Student, 
CSU Northridge 

B.G. Ramirez
, Graphic Artist
Jeffrey J. Rangel, 
Art Historian

Phillip Rodriguez, 
Film Director

Richard T. Rodriguez, Ph.D
, Chicano Studies Professor
, CSU Los Angeles

Alfred Salas
, Mexican Folkloric Dancer

Marcos Sanchez-Tranquilino
, Alchemist/Researcher

Ray Santisteban
, Film Director

Elias Serna, 
High School Teacher
Esteban Torres
, Commisioner 
(former U.S. Congressman)


Ruben Trejo, 
Artist

Joe Harry Troncoso
, Artist

Luis A. Vega, 
Writer/Performer

Carlos Velez-Ibañez, Ph.D.
Anthropologist

Jaime Villaneda, 
Curator 

Rio Yañez
, Student
, CALARTS

Tomás Ybarra-Frausto
, Associate Director
Arts and Humanities
, The Rockefeller Foundation


Willie Herrón
, Artist/Musician
, 2000
from Chicano Male Unbonded series
©2000, Harry Gamboa Jr.
11 inches x 14 inches
Gelatin Silver Print
Edition of six

1998
Tomas Carrasco
, Actor/Comedian

Abelardo de la Peña, 
Internet Publisher

Octavio Tizóc Diaz-Gaitan
, Student 

Lorenzo Flores III
, Student
, UC Berkeley

Lorenzo Flores Jr., 
Chicano Studies Professor, 
CSU Northridge

Gary Fresquez
, Elementary School Teacher

James Gamboa
, High School Teacher

Ricardo Gonzalves
, Concrete Poet
Genaro Molina
, Photographer
, Los Angeles Times

Chon A. Noriega, Ph.D.
, Film Theorist, 
UC Los Angeles

Roberto Sifuentes Sr.
, Chicano Studies Professor
, CSU Northridge

Raúl Homero Villa, Ph.D.
, Professor, 
Occidental College


1997
Joe Carreño
, Zine Publisher
Harry T. Gamboa
, Printing Supervisor
 (retired)

Otoño Luján
, Artist/Musician

Jason Ordaz
, Musician

Roberto Sifuentes Jr.
, Performance Artist

Jesús “Chuy” Torres, 
Poet/Performer

Daniel Villarreal
, Actor


Juan Garza
, Film Director
, 1996
from Chicano Male Unbonded
©1996, Harry Gamboa Jr.
11 inches x 14 inches
Gelatin Silver Print
Edition of six

1996
C. Ondine Chavoya, Ph.D. 
Art Historian

Juan Garza
, Film Director

José Luis Ruiz
, Executive Producer
, Chicano! 

Roberto Trujillo, Ph.D
, Head
, Special Collections
, Stanford University Libraries


Juan Felipe Herrera, 
Poet, 1995
from Chicano Male Unbonded series
©1995, Harry Gamboa Jr.
11 inches x 14 inches
Gelatin Silver Print
Edition of six

1995
Rudy Guglielmo Jr., 
Arts Administrator

Jack Vargas
, Librarian

Juan Felipe Herrera, 
Poet 


1994
Alfred Arteaga
, Poet
Roberto Bedoya
, Poet

Robert Buitron
, Photographer

George Gamboa, 
Polymer Technical Engineer

Ken Zaragoza
, Student

1993
Henry J. Gutierrez, Ph.D.
, Professor
, CSU San Jose

Willie Varela, 
Film/Video Director
 
1992
Ralph Cordova
, Performance Artist

Richard Montoya
, Actor/Comedian

Jesús Salvador Treviño
, Film/Television Director

Armando Rascón
, Artist/Curator
Rene Yañez, 
Artist/Curator 

Diego Gamboa
, Student
Anthony C. Sandoval
, Performer


Humberto Sandoval, Actor, 1991
from Chicano Male Unbonded
 series
©1991, Harry Gamboa Jr.
11 inches x 14 inches
Gelatin Silver Print
Edition of six

1991
David Avalos, 
Artist

Oscar Garza
, Arts Editor, 
Los Angeles Times

Victor Gamboa, 
Elementary School Teacher

Curtis Gutierrez
, Artist
Miguel Juarez,
 Paseño

Eloy Rodriguez, Ph.D.
Phytochemist, 
UC Irvine
Humberto Sandoval
, Actor

John Valadez
, Artist

Zaragosa Vargas, Ph.D.
Historian
, UC Santa Barbara

Gerardo Velázquez
, Synthesized Music Composer

Rick Salazar
, Photographer


http://www.harrygamboajr.com

 

 

 

Live Artists Live

usc_liveartistslive29jan16aEMAILusc_liveartistslive29jan16dEMAILusc_liveartistslive29jan16cEMAILusc_liveartistslive29jan16bEMAILusc_liveartistslive29jan16eEMAILusc_liveartistslive29jan16fEMAILLive Artists Live
Performance Art and the Archive
http://visionsandvoices.usc.edu/live-artists-live-performance-art-and-the-archive/

Friday
January 29, 2016

USC Visions & Voices
The Arts and Humanities Initiative

USC Roski
School of Art and Design

 

l-r:
Erin Silver
Harry Gamboa Jr.
©2016, Barbara Carrasco

l-r:
Ron Athey
Amelia Jones
©2016, Harry Gamboa Jr.

l-r:
Ruben Mendoza
Nicole Scalissi
Harry Gamboa Jr.
©2016, Barbara Carrasco

l-r:
Nao Bustamante
Ron Athey
Dominic Johnson
Jennifer Doyle
Cassils
©2016, Harry Gamboa Jr.

l-r:
Karen Rapp
Nicole Scalissi
Barbara Carrasco
©2016, Harry Gamboa Jr.

l-r:
Cassils
Harry Gamboa Jr.
©2016, Harry Gamboa Jr.

 

University of Southern California
Los Angeles

 

http://www.harrygamboajr.com

 

 

 

This Is The City – UCLA Film Archive

hg_ucla_film_archive13nov15aEMAILchon_hg_billy_wilder13nov15EMAILbilly_wilder13nov15bEMAILhg_mark_billy_wilder13nov15EMAILfred_john_barbz_dan13nov15EMAIL This Is The City:  Symposium Opening Night

November 13, 2015 – 7:30 pm
 
 
Westwood
 
 Images:
 
Harry Gamboa Jr. delivering keynote address Forever/Never on a Smoggy Day
Photo:  Barbara Carrasco
 
Dr. Chon Noriega, Director, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center;
Harry Gamboa Jr.
Photo:  Barbara Carrasco
 
Dr. Jan Christopher Horak, Director, UCLA Film & Television Archive;
Dr. Mark Shiel, King’s College London;
Dr. Joshua Glick, Hendrix College;
Harry Gamboa Jr.;
Dr. Jacqueline Stewart, University of Chicago;
Dr. Dan Streible, NYU,
Mark Quigley, UCLA Film & Television Archive,
Dr. Chon Noriega, Director, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center; 
Dr. Lynn Spigel, Northwestern University.
Photo:  Barbara Carrasco
 
Harry Gamboa Jr.
Mark Quigley, UCLA Film & Television Archive
Photo:  Barbara Carrasco
 
Fred Wells;
John Cheang, Producer, NBC News; 
Barbara Carrasco; 
Daniel Centofanti
Photo:  Harry Gamboa Jr.
 
 
 
 
 

Asco – No Movies – CAPC Bordeaux

bordeaux_asco25jun14aBLOGAsco – No Movies
26.06.2014 -> 05.10.2014
CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux
France

 

bordeaux_asco26jun14cBLOG

Asco – No Movies
CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux

 

bordeaux_asco26jun14bBLOGAsco – No Movies
Exhibition Reception
CAPC

bordeaux_asco25jun14bBLOG

Bordeaux – Los Angeles 50 Year Partnership at U.S. Consulate – Bordeaux Reception
l-r:
Harry Gamboa Jr.
Thomas Wolf (U.S. consul in Bordeaux)
Dan Finsel


http://www.sistercitiesofla.com/centre-darts-plastiques-contemporian

hg_valadez28jun14cBLOGl-r:
Harry Gamboa Jr.
with
John Valadez
,
mural production studio at Musée d’Aquitaine Bordeaux

Photo:  David Diaz, Ph.D.

John Valadez
http://www.musee-aquitaine-bordeaux.fr/en/event/chicano-dream-chicano-artists-cheech-marin-collection-1980-2010

 

ASCO no movies Asco – qui signifie dégoût ou nausée en espagnol – est un important collectif d’artistes chicanos (première génération d’Américano-mexicains) actif dans les années 1970-1980. Ils réalisaient des performances, photographies, films et peintures dans les rues d’East Los Angeles, en marge de la scène artistique de LA. —- Extravagants à outrance, vêtus de costumes chinés ou fabriqués par leurs soins, les membres d’Asco mettaient en scène des performances provocantes qu’ils immortalisaient sous formes de photographies intitulées “No Movies”. Ce simple énoncé paradoxal plaçait leur action dans la catégorie des films conceptuels – une narration éphémère assimilée à une affiche ou un photogramme de film hollywoodien, dans lesquels les membres d’Asco devenaient de pseudo-ʺstars du barrioʺ. Leurs actions et performances étaient créées en réaction aux troubles sociaux et aux émeutes raciales de l’époque à Los Angeles. Leurs tableaux investissaient souvent les lieux d’incidents importants dans les jours qui suivaient l’événement sans que l’imagerie et le style de la performance y fasse directement référence. Si Asco appartenait à une contre-culture politique chicano, son esthétique adoptait une toute autre ligne. De fait, ce mélange d’art et de politique combiné à l’héritage chicano et à la pop, le punk et la mode de l’époque est unique. Le collectif a récemment été réhabilité au sein de l’histoire de la création artistique de LA et ses œuvres ont trouvé un nouvel écho auprès des jeunes générations d’artistes intéressés par la performativité, les fictions médiatiques et l’activisme politique. La première exposition monographique consacrée à Asco (Asco: Elite of the Obscure) a eu lieu en 2012 à Los Angeles dans le cadre de Pacific Standard Time, un événement protéiforme organisé par The Getty (expositions, performances, manifestations diverses et édition de livres) qui retrace l’histoire et l’influence des arts visuels à Los Angeles dans la seconde moitié du XXème siècle. Cette exposition saluée par la critique avait été conçue à partir d’une thèse de doctorat ayant pour sujet Asco. Elle présentait une chronologie des activités du collectif au moyen d’archives et d’œuvres variées, ainsi qu’une publication exhaustive. L’œuvre d’Asco a récemment fait l’objet d’expositions à la Tate Modern, la Tate Liverpool, au Centre Pompidou et d’un article important dans Artforum en 2011. L’exposition présentée au CAPC vise à insister sur l’importance de leur travail au regard des critères de l’art performatif et de l’art interdisciplinaire réalisé dans la seconde moitié du 20ème siècle.  L’exposition d’Asco au LACMA était impressionnante d’érudition et se concentrait essentiellement sur la photographie. Celle du CAPC en revanche, s’intéresse autant aux costumes, aux vidéos et aux installations qu’aux photos, dans le but de reconstituer sous forme d’exposition les dimensions performatives, physiques et le rapport au contexte des œuvres d’Asco. Les principaux prismes d’interprétation de cette exposition sont les explications des artistes eux-mêmes concernant leurs œuvres et le contexte politique, culturel et historique dans lequel elles ont été réalisées.

Irene Aristizábal et Alex Farquharson sont les commissaires d’Asco: No Movies, une collaboration entre De Appel arts centre d’Amsterdam et le CAPC Musée d’Art Contemporain de Bordeaux. L’exposition s’appuie sur la récente rétrospective Asco: Elite of the Obscure préparée par les commissaires Rita Gonzalez et C. Ondine Chavoya pour le compte du Los Angeles County Museum of Art et du Williams College Museum of Art.

Exposition realize avec le soutien de Chaucer Freight et l’Ambassade des Etats-Unis d’ Amérique en France. Dans le cadre du 50 anniversaire du jumelage Bordeaux-Los Angeles Bordeaux – Los Angeles 50 Year Partnership.

 

ASCO — which means disgust or nausea in Spanish — are an important Chicano (first generation Mexican American) collective active in the 1970s-80s working with performance, photography, film and painting on the streets of East Los Angeles, beyond the centre of the L.A. art world.  Highly flamboyant, ASCO staged provocative performances that were captured on camera as photographs they called ‘no movies’.  Their actions and performances were created in response to the social unrest and race riots that occurred at this time in Los Angeles.  While belonging to a political Chicano counter-culture, aesthetically they went in quite a different direction.  As such, their combination of art and politics, interwoven with their Chicano heritage and the pop, punk and fashion of their time, is unique.

CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux
7 rue Ferrère
F-33000 Bordeaux
France

Tél. +33 (0)5 56 00 81 50
http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr

 

http://www.harrygamboajr.com 

 

 

The View From Here: L.A. and Photography – The Getty Center

getty31may14BLOGThe View From Here: L.A. and Photography

The Getty Center

Harold M. Williams Auditorium

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Los Angeles

 l-r:

Stephen Shore
Alex Prager
Harry Gamboa Jr.
Colin Westerbeck
John Divola

Photo:
©2014, Veronica Corona-Popovic

Sponsored by the Getty Museum Photographs Council on the occasion of the 175th anniversary of photography’s invention, this all-day symposium addressed the state of photography as it relates to Los Angeles during the past 25 years.

Introductory remarks:

Timothy Potts
Director
J. Paul Getty Museum

An Education: Teaching and Studying Photography in L.A.

Panelists:
JoAnn Callis
Robbert Flick
John Divola
James Welling

Moderator:
Anne Wilkes Tucker

Los Angeles Shoots Itself: Looking at Southern California

Panelists:
Matthew Brandt
John Divola
Harry Gamboa Jr.
Alex Prager
Stephen Shore

Moderator:
Colin Westerbeck

From the Rearview Mirror: Critical Perspectives on L.A.

Panelists:
Jan de Bont
Christopher Knight
Rebecca Morse
Jennifer Watts

Moderator:
Virginia Heckert

Closing Remarks:

Judith Keller
Senior Curator
Department of Photographs
The Getty Museum

 

http://www.harrygamboajr.com